Monthly Archives

March 2014

Bathtub Liners: The Acrylic Advantage

By | Bathroom Remodeling, Bathtub Liners, Uncategorized | No Comments

Bathtub Liners: The Acrylic Advantage-Acrylic-300x96The use of acrylic in baths is one of the newest innovations in the bathroom remodeling industry! Our bathtub liners are made out of high molecular acrylic for durability, style and ease of maintenance. This acrylic is the most scientifically advanced in the industry.

Benefits of Acrylic Bathtub Liners:

  • Clean
  • Durable
  • Easy to maintain
  • Won’t mildew or leak
  • After many years, will look good as new.

Bathtub Liners: The Acrylic Advantage-LuxBathAcrylicAdvantage

 

Learn more about Acrylic Bathtub Liners in Columbus, Ohio.

Steam Shower Installation by Luxury Bath of Ohio

By | Bathroom Remodeling, Full Bathroom Remodel, Uncategorized | One Comment

A steam shower is a type of bathroom shower unit that uses a humidifying steam generator to create water vapors in the shower. It works much like a steam room while also offering the typical features of a full bathroom shower, like shower heads and accessories.

Steam showers aren’t just fixtures in the finest spas anymore. We make it possible for customers to enjoy and benefit from that same spa experience every day, in their own home. Take a look at this one!

Prepare For Bathroom Remodeling With This Checklist

By | Bathroom Remodeling, Bathroom Remodeling Tips, Making the Decision to Remodel Your Bathroom, Uncategorized | No Comments

Remodeling a bathroom can be overwhelming. You have to decide how much you can spend, select the right products, and determine if you’re going to change the layout.

And that’s often before you call a contractor.

To ensure that your bathroom remodeling projects runs smoothly, here’s a checklist to keep your project on track. Remember: A successful renovation is all about smart timing!

6 Months Out

-Get inspired. To figure out what you want your new bathroom to look like, tear pages out of magazines and catalogues, and make a scrapbook or inspiration board. Designer Holly Rickert tells clients to use Post-Its to note why they like each bathroom. Later, she recommends flipping through the photos to find commonalities, and select similar tiles and fixtures.

-Ask around for contractor recommendations. While it’s not necessary to talk to a contractor yet, it’s a good time to start poking around for recommendations from local hardware stores, friends, and professional business associations. Then, when you’re ready to make the call, you’ll have a ready list of names.

-Start sketching. It’s essential to consider layout early on. Spend time thinking about what works about your bathroom’s layout—and what doesn’t. Consider storage needs: Could a closet be turned into a custom cabinet offering lots of stash spots?

Lastly, would you like to move the toilet, sink, or bathtub, and if so, what is feasible plumbing-wise? Are you going to expand the size of the bathroom or simply improve its aesthetic?

Keep in mind that the most expensive thing to move in a bathroom is the toilet. Also, if you plan to install multiple body sprays in the shower, it’s likely that your bathroom will require more rough plumbing work, so the cost will be higher.

3 Months Out

-Finalize your budget. According to the National Kitchen and Bath Association , the average person will spend about $11,000 renovating a bathroom. Once you’ve figured out what you can spend, you should count on spending about two-thirds of your budget on labor. Then you’ll have a clearer sense of what you can spend on tile, fixtures, and extras, like a glass shower door.

If the remaining amount seems low, don’t fret: Thanks to a wide range of tile and fittings options, you can often replicate a high-end luxury look for less. For example, a tile that costs $10 per square foot can substitute for $100-per-square foot tile.

-Hire a contractor. With a few months to go before demolition, it’s a good time to bring in a licensed contractor. Ask a few to look at your drawings and make sure your plan—adding two shower heads, installing a Jacuzzi tub, etc.—is possible. Review estimates, check references thoroughly, and sign contracts. At this point, the contractor should commit to a start date, create a timeline of when he needs materials, and estimate when the project will be complete. Most bathroom renovations take about six weeks from start to finish. Don’t let any work begin without a signed contract.

Be sure to talk up front about the pay schedule: Often, you’ll pay a third up front, a third at the halfway point, and a third when the project is complete to your satisfaction.

Find out exactly how many days you’ll be without a shower, especially if you’re renovating your home’s only full bath. Make alternate plans in advance.

Two Months Out:

-Purchase tile and fixtures. While some tile orders can be fulfilled in two to three days, handmade or hand-painted tiles could take 12 weeks. Play it safe and make sure your tile orders are placed at least eight weeks before your demo date.

Fixtures should also be purchased early. Even big-name manufacturers can take three to four weeks to deliver products. High-end products often take as long as six to eight weeks to arrive.

If you’re ordering custom-built vanity or cabinets, check with the manufacturer to make sure that they’ll be there when the contractor needs them. Light fixtures can also take several weeks to arrive, so give yourself plenty of leeway when ordering.

One Month Out:

-Prep for contractor’s arrival. Clear out medicine cabinets and bathroom closets, and set up a temporary grooming space where you can get ready out of sight of contractors.

-Shop for accessories. With most of the hard planning over, have fun shopping for towel bars, towel hooks, a toilet paper holder, and the perfect soap dish. If you have a new color scheme, pick out your new shower curtain or towels.

-Select a paint color. Once the tile is up and the flooring is down, you’ll be able to get a sense of what color to paint the walls. It’s difficult to pick anything before that.

-Check in with your contractor often. Every day, when the contractor arrives, ask what will be done that day and mention any project hiccups and concerns you might have. Keep the lines of communication open. Make sure he knows where to store materials and how to get into the house if you’re not there. Keep pets and children away from the work site.

Final Days:

-Be flexible. If a project runs a few days over, try not to get frustrated. If that’s the biggest problem you’ve had, you got off easy.

-Inspect the contractor’s work. Chances are you’ll do this every day, but if anything seems amiss, try to address it before the job is completed.

-Celebrate. Throw down your new bath mats, unpack your toiletries, and sip a glass of Champagne.

This article originally appeared on ELLEDECOR.com.

Bathtub Liner Cleaning and Tips for Maintenance

By | Bathroom Maintenance, Bathtub Liners, Uncategorized | 3 Comments

For normal everyday cleaning of your bathtub liner, we suggest the use of a mild soap and water, with a soft wash cloth. Use of scouring pads or abrasive cleansers will dull the bathtub liner surface. Should you wish to use a product not listed below, test on a small area in the corner of the skirt before applying to the entire bathtub liner. Always review individual cleansers’ instructions and rinse thoroughly after cleaning.

Recommended Cleaner for Bathtub Liner

We recommend using Dawn dish soap and water, Formula 409, or X-IT. Vinegar and water may also be used to soften water minerals. If you require a disinfectant, you may use Clorox Bleach diluted with water to sanitize the enclosure.

Do not use:
Original Clean Shower, Clean Shower for Plastic Showers and Glass, Soft Scrub, Dow disinfectant cleaner, Lysol disinfectant cleaner, acetone, Lestoil, ammonia, fingernail polish remover, aerosol cleaners, or scouring pads.

Use of the chemicals will cause a dull surface and/or an easily recognizable chemical crack. This will void your product warranty.

There is no need to use abrasive cleaners. Abrasive cleaners dull the gloss over a period of years. In extreme cases where the recommended cleaners do not work, use a Chore Boy or 3M Sponge pad. Make sure you only use the ones recommended for Teflon Surfaces.

Recommended Drain Cleaner for Bathtub Liner 

Liquid drain cleaners are recommended over powders and/or crystal. However, when using liquid drain cleaning agents, bail the standing water out of the bathtub and remove the drain plug. Use a funnel to prevent spills and apply the chemicals directly down the drain. Always make certain that chemicals do not come in contact with the acrylic surface. Use drain cleaners sparingly, so that they do not boil out and attack the acrylic surface.

How to Removal a Standard Drain Plug

Occasionally your bathtub drain may slow down due to hair, etc., in the cross bars. In order to remove the standard drain plug, you must:

  1. Push it down in the closed position
  2. Turn the knob counter-clockwise, and remove it. Under the knob there is a stationary brass peg;
  3. Turn the peg counter-clockwise using a pair of pliers.
  4. When you remove the peg, the drain plug will also come out.
  5. Remove any obstacles from the crossbars.

If you have any questions or concerns about caring for your bathtub liner, please contact us at anytime!